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Posts Tagged ‘Japanese’

So, I’ve had this:

White Rabbit Kanji Poster

HUGE kanji poster stuck on my wall for months now. I stare at it in wonder relatively often, but that’s about as far as it goes. It’s all the JLPT kanji in order and with readings. It… kind of freaks me out though. I started going through them today from the beginning and got further than I honestly thought I’d get, but not far enough! One good thing is that the colors also correspond to the flash card sets (I believe… I haven’t fully tested this hypothesis) and so once I get fully organized (hahaha!!) I will be all set to go.

Hopefully.

But, being sick has thrown a spanner in just about every works possible. I now have two Korean tests back to back on Monday (I’m not that worried, really) but also a TON of homework for the class (which I haven’t done with being ill). Being so busy (and learning another language) is really impacting my Japanese learning. I’m not sure what to do about that though. I’d love to be trilingual, but somehow I don’t think it’s going to happen.

We’ll see.

Anyway, time for medication and hot tea (I am really craving the bamboo-leaf tea 김선생님 shared with us a couple of weeks ago).

またね

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I’m here at school (feeling rather sick) trying to learn Korean verbs for a test this afternoon. Korean stems are so different from Japanese in that they all end in 다. The conjugation depends on the stem which lies before the 다. For example 알다 becomes 알아요, whereas 먹다 becomes 먹어요. It’s all dependent on the last vowel of the stem. Of the stem 알다, the last vowel is “a” and so the conjugation is “a yo”. For 먹다, the last vowel is “o”, so the conjugation becomes “o yo”. Basically, it can be summed up as:

If the last vowel of the stem is either 아 or 오, ~아요 is used. All other stems take 어요. Of course, there are a few exceptions to this rule (when aren’t there exceptions!!) But I’m not going to go into them this morning…

Japanese conjugation (when compared to Korean) is much harder since there are many more ways to conjugate everything. Endings (such as ~ru or ~u) play a major role with 買うbecoming 買いますand 食べる becoming 食べます… but not all ~ru verbs conjugate as ~ru (some are ~u) and not all ~u verbs conjugate the same.

Mmm cappuccino. This makes my day so much better! Now I just need to remember these 20 verbs for my test this afternoon and how they’re conjugated. >.< It never ends!

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We’re sick! We’ve been trying to avoid it–using hand sanitizer up the wazoo–but it finally happened. Both Phoenix and I are sniffling and coughing and not feeling that good at all! Just when I thought I was going to get a couple of nice days off from school to rest and chillax, here I am feeling like death on a stick!

Starsquid over at チョコチョコ has issued somewhat of a challenge! In “Confessions of a study-book-shopaholic” he lists the humongous amount of Japanese study books that he has. OH MY! What a list! So, now I’m sort of tempted to dig out all of mine and give them some serious air time in a 本のチャレンジ!! I doubt I’ll win, but looking at my bookshelf, I can perhaps at least come a little close!!!  So, my friends, check back later for the post!!! It will be quite amusing, if nothing else!

That being said, I am going to get ready, have my coffee and head off to the doctor. Schools and busses must be contacted and so on and so on. Who said being sick was a cop out? They’re wrong!!!

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I made 군만두 (goon mandu) for the first time yesterday. They are fried (and part-steamed) Korean dumplings filled with all sorts of yummy stuff. I was surprised how well they turned out. I should have taken my own photo, but here from the web is a photo of ones that look very similar…

Mandu

Yummacious! Really! With some dipping sauce (soy sauce, vinegar, sugar, sliced green onion etc etc)… mmmm….

And on to grammar:

~ても

“even if, although”  – used when that which is expressed in the main clause is not what is expected from the content of the dependent clause. (huh? what? eh???)

私は雨が降っても行く

I’ll go even if it rains

私は寒くても出かける

I’ll go out even if it is cold

To me, it seems almost the same as saying “despite” (though I’m sure there’s a different phrase for that in Japanese.. ^.^)

Some more examples:

中山さんは本を買っても読まない

Mr. Nakayama doesn’t read books even if he buys them

私は四時間歩いても疲れなかった

I didn’t get tired although I walked for four hours

〜てもいいですか?

^ this is an idiomatic expression used to request permission to do something.

ても can also mean “no matter what, who or where”

だれに話しても = no matter who someone talks to

何を話しても = no matter what someone talks about

どこで話しても = no matter where someone talks

It seemed a little confusing to me at first, but it is pretty easy to use this formation in every day speech. It comes quite naturally, since in English we often say “although x I still y” or “even if x I will still y”

That being said, I am going to go finish my coffee and play some pointless video games. I studied so hard for my linguistics exam (and got a 92%!!) so I feel justified in my slacking!! ^^;

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Greetings, in both Korean and Japanese, are very different to those in English. For example, usually we just say “hello!” or “How are you?” or “Nice to see you” no matter the time of day or the person we’re speaking to. In both Japanese and Korean there are many more rules about what to say and to whom.

For example, in Japanese greetings are largely dependent on the time of day:

おはようございます = good morning

こんにちは = good afternoon (said after about 11am)

こんばんは = good evening (said after about 4pm)

as well as the “level” of the person you’re talking to.

おはよう = to a friend or one of lesser standing (a senior to a junior)

おはようございます = to anyone of higher standing (boss, teacher etc)

Korean too has different ways of addressing people.

안녕하세요? = are you well? can be said to anyone, usually those of higher standing.

안녕= only to friends or those of lesser standing.

Neither language specifically addresses “you”. Often they omit “you” and “I” when it’s (supposedly) obvious. However, sometimes in conversation this can present problems. If you don’t know whether the person is of higher standing or not (are they a professor or are they a graduate student?) the best thing to do is simply opt for polite (but not overly so) address until you can discern where they lie on the “politeness-spectrum”.

And something completely unrelated:

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Wow, what a feast! We went to Jungle Jims here and ended up buying a lot of yummy food (and drink!)

The 酒 is Hakushika and is YUMMY!!

a

From the website:

hakusHakushika means “white deer.” This brand name comes from the mystic legend of a white deer with spiritual powers in China… Once upon a time, Emperor Hsüan-tsung (712-756) found a white deer straying into the lotus garden of his palace. It had a copper medal at the base of its antler. The words engraved on the medal proved that this beautiful animal had been alive over a thousand years. Emperor Hsüan-tsung was so delighted at this good omen as to give a feast and he cherished the white deer as a holy animal. According to this tradition, White deer—Hakushika—has been recognized as a symbol of longevity of a thousand years. We named our sake Hakushika after this auspicious holy animal with a wish that our sake should be always synonymous with life energy flow, longevity and good omen.

hakku

We also had 鰻のすし and 大福餅… so now I am sooo …. full!!! 「食べ過ぎだよ!」

So, there really won’t be much else in this post ^^;   I am just too full and sleepy now!!

@_@

また明日ね

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I saw a cute video today:

I found it while checking out マギー先生. It’s sooo cute. My dog often sleeps like that too! Anyway, back to business. I posted a question regarding how to thank a professor, for example (on the Maggie Sensei site) and got an amazingly in depth reply. It’s certainly VERY helpful. I love the site so much that I am going to print out a flier and stick it outside the 100/200 level class room this week. I think everyone can benefit from a site like this. Other education sites I’ve seen aren’t as… responsive (maybe since the site is relatively new), or they take themselves too seriously (or they cost a fortune and perhaps don’t deliver!) In fact, I find that sites tend to be for the complete beginner or aimed at upper intermediate/advanced students. It’s good to finally find a site that does a little of both. Some of the lessons I know already and can nod my head and feel smug (muhaha) but then some of the others are challenging and hard work for me to understand (which I like occasionally)!!

Random Grammar:

Question word + 〜ても

Question words such as 何、いつ、だれ、どこ、何度、followed by て-form and も indicate “no matter what/when/who/where/ how often, etc.

富士山は、いつ見てもきれいです。

Mt. Fuji is beautiful no matter when we look at it

何を食べても太らない人がうやらましいです。

I envy people who never get fat no matter what they eat.

東京の町は、どこへ行っても人で込んでいます。

Tokyo is crowded with people no matter where you go.

^.^

それでは、また。


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