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Archive for the ‘한국어’ Category

So, I’ve had this:

White Rabbit Kanji Poster

HUGE kanji poster stuck on my wall for months now. I stare at it in wonder relatively often, but that’s about as far as it goes. It’s all the JLPT kanji in order and with readings. It… kind of freaks me out though. I started going through them today from the beginning and got further than I honestly thought I’d get, but not far enough! One good thing is that the colors also correspond to the flash card sets (I believe… I haven’t fully tested this hypothesis) and so once I get fully organized (hahaha!!) I will be all set to go.

Hopefully.

But, being sick has thrown a spanner in just about every works possible. I now have two Korean tests back to back on Monday (I’m not that worried, really) but also a TON of homework for the class (which I haven’t done with being ill). Being so busy (and learning another language) is really impacting my Japanese learning. I’m not sure what to do about that though. I’d love to be trilingual, but somehow I don’t think it’s going to happen.

We’ll see.

Anyway, time for medication and hot tea (I am really craving the bamboo-leaf tea 김선생님 shared with us a couple of weeks ago).

またね

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I’m here at school (feeling rather sick) trying to learn Korean verbs for a test this afternoon. Korean stems are so different from Japanese in that they all end in 다. The conjugation depends on the stem which lies before the 다. For example 알다 becomes 알아요, whereas 먹다 becomes 먹어요. It’s all dependent on the last vowel of the stem. Of the stem 알다, the last vowel is “a” and so the conjugation is “a yo”. For 먹다, the last vowel is “o”, so the conjugation becomes “o yo”. Basically, it can be summed up as:

If the last vowel of the stem is either 아 or 오, ~아요 is used. All other stems take 어요. Of course, there are a few exceptions to this rule (when aren’t there exceptions!!) But I’m not going to go into them this morning…

Japanese conjugation (when compared to Korean) is much harder since there are many more ways to conjugate everything. Endings (such as ~ru or ~u) play a major role with 買うbecoming 買いますand 食べる becoming 食べます… but not all ~ru verbs conjugate as ~ru (some are ~u) and not all ~u verbs conjugate the same.

Mmm cappuccino. This makes my day so much better! Now I just need to remember these 20 verbs for my test this afternoon and how they’re conjugated. >.< It never ends!

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Things have been super crazy–hence the lack of blog posting! I pimped out Maggie Sensei this week and had some good feedback about that (and several questions about why I’m pitching someone else’s site and not my own!! I just think it’s a really good place to start, continue, or end! LOL).

I got my Korean exam grade back… *drum roll* … I got 100% !!! =^.^=  yeah! So I am extremely happy about that.

I’ve been watching 꽃보다 남자 (known as 花より男子 in Japan) and at first I was completely put off by the difference (I loved the characters in the Japanese version, so getting used to the Korean actors was a bit… difficult). The plot line has some major deviations and I was intrigued by those too. Now I’m on episode 15 and finally liking everything about it!

korea-boys-before-flowers-001

I was unsure about 구혜선 as the lead female character (금잔디), but I think I’ve finally accepted her! 井上真央 was so good as the corresponding role in the Japanese version that I was a bit… let down at first with the Korean attempt at this. However, 꽃보다 남자 is just a new series in Korea (airing earlier this year) and so it isn’t as established as the Japanese version (plus the original was from the corresponding manga).

I’m already finding that I can understand many of the words they’re saying to each other. In some of the episodes the subtitles have been slightly delayed, so I’ve tried to work out as they speak. It’s pretty awesome!

It’s frustrating that this is the only “immersion” I get in the language though, and that makes becoming fluent hard. I know some people who’ve done it though, and I plan to talk to them about it soon–and I will definitely update this blog with all that information (one person has lived in Korea for 20 years and is now a Korean citizen, and the other lives in the US and is married to my Korean professor–but he had to learn all by himself other than a little help from her!!)

Anyway, I’m off to finish this 酒 and have some more kimchi

=^.^=

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Greetings, in both Korean and Japanese, are very different to those in English. For example, usually we just say “hello!” or “How are you?” or “Nice to see you” no matter the time of day or the person we’re speaking to. In both Japanese and Korean there are many more rules about what to say and to whom.

For example, in Japanese greetings are largely dependent on the time of day:

おはようございます = good morning

こんにちは = good afternoon (said after about 11am)

こんばんは = good evening (said after about 4pm)

as well as the “level” of the person you’re talking to.

おはよう = to a friend or one of lesser standing (a senior to a junior)

おはようございます = to anyone of higher standing (boss, teacher etc)

Korean too has different ways of addressing people.

안녕하세요? = are you well? can be said to anyone, usually those of higher standing.

안녕= only to friends or those of lesser standing.

Neither language specifically addresses “you”. Often they omit “you” and “I” when it’s (supposedly) obvious. However, sometimes in conversation this can present problems. If you don’t know whether the person is of higher standing or not (are they a professor or are they a graduate student?) the best thing to do is simply opt for polite (but not overly so) address until you can discern where they lie on the “politeness-spectrum”.

And something completely unrelated:

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